Resources for Cancer information

Getting information about cancer and cancer treatment options may help you to feel more in control and ready for what is happening.

Your capacity to take in information can be affected by a stressful event such as the diagnosis of cancer. With this in mind, we recommend you approach this information with an open mind. Read what is relevant to you and take your time to take in the content.

This information is not designed to replace the information given by your treating doctor or health care team. We encourage you to talk with your doctor or health team about the questions and concerns you have. For further information, please feel free to call Cancer Council 13 11 20, Monday to Friday, between 9am and 5pm (excluding public holidays). Or contact us online.

The information available on this page should not be used as a substitute for advice from a qualified medical professional who can advise you on your own individual medical needs. It is not meant to be medical advice and is provided for general information purposes only. See our Disclaimer.

In this section you can find information on:

What is cancer?

Defining cancer allows you to understand how cancer affects your body and prepare for what is happening.

Cancer will affect one in two Queenslanders in their lifetime. Learn what causes cancer and how they develop, grow and spread.

Initial diagnosis

The emotional impact of cancer Most people will experience strong emotions after a cancer diagnosis, not only when they first hear that it’s cancer, but also at various times during or after treatment. Cancer is a serious disease, the treatment may take a long time and can be demanding, and there are many periods of…

Cancer tests

Your doctors will run a number of tests to get a diagnosis, see if the cancer has spread to other parts of your body and develop a treatment plan. The tests you have will depend on the type of cancer and your specific symptoms. These tests may include: Physical examination Blood tests Biopsy Bone scan…

Types of Cancer

Physical Activity - running

There are many types of cancer, each with its own treatment. Learn about specific cancer types.

Treatment decisions

Sometimes it is difficult to decide on the type of treatment to have. You may feel that everything is happening too fast, or you might be anxious to get started. Check with your specialist how soon treatment should begin – often it won’t affect the success of the treatment to wait a while. Ask them…

Types of treatment

Your cancer treatment will depend on the type of cancer you have. Your medical team will recommend treatment based on what will give you the best outcome, where the cancer is, whether and how the cancer has spread, your general health and your preferences. The treatment options you are offered will depend on the guidelines…

Side-effects

Treatment side effects vary depending on the type of cancer you have, the stage of the cancer, and the type of treatment you are given. The changes can be both physical and emotional. Some side effects resolve quickly; others can take weeks, months or even years to improve. Your body will cope with the treatment and…

Complementary therapies

Conventional cancer treatments have been through a research process to see whether they work and are safe. This is known as evidence-based medicine. While some complementary therapies are supported by strong evidence, others are not. As their use increases, many are now being scientifically tested to see whether they are safe for people with cancer…

Living well after cancer

After a cancer diagnosis, people are often kept busy and preoccupied with medical appointments and the demands of treatment. Coming to the end of treatment may be a time when you notice the impact cancer had on you, your family and friends.Many people live for a long time after cancer treatment. The challenges you face…

Carer support

A carer provides unpaid care and support to a person who needs their assistance because of a disease such as cancer, or disability, mental illness or ageing. Anyone can be a carer regardless of your age, sex, sexuality, profession or cultural background. You may still be adjusting to the news that you need to care…

Advanced cancer

Advanced cancer is a term commonly used to describe primary or secondary cancer that is unlikely to be cured. Health professionals may also use the terms secondary, metastatic, and progressive cancer to describe cancer that has moved beyond early stages. Sometimes health professionals don’t use a particular name. While advanced cancer usually cannot be cured,…

Order or download resources

Cancer resources

Information and resources Cancer Council Queensland provides support, information and resources, at no cost, for people throughout Queensland. These services are made possible through the generous donations of Queenslanders and we thank them for their continued support. To ensure we can provide information to all Queenslanders, and due to increasing changes in information, please only…