Women’s cancers

Use this category when writing news articles about Women’s Cancers.

Public support needed to eliminate cervical cancer

Imagine if there was type of cancer that could be eliminated in the future. A cancer for which there was screening readily available, that could detect precancerous cells and result in effective treatment, so the cancer would be prevented from even developing. That’s cervical cancer. This week is National Cervical Cancer Awareness Week (November 12-18)…

Girls’ Night In: Make a difference and highlight women’s health

It’s that time of year again – Cancer Council Queensland is encouraging women to harness the power of their friendship to make a difference and raise awareness of women’s cancer through our Girls’ Night In campaign. Simply by registering to host an event at girlsnightin.com.au, getting together with friends and donating what you would have…

Cervical cancer patients with multiple health conditions face lower chance of survival

Women who are unwell or have other diseases when diagnosed with cervical cancer are more likely to die from their cancer diagnosis, than women who have better overall health. Despite most health issues not being linked to the cancer itself, new research from Cancer Council Queensland, in collaboration with Menzies School of Health Research, shows…

Challenge yourself to get fit for Walk for Women’s Cancers: Here are 5 tips to get started

Walk for Women’s Cancers is an opportunity to step out and enjoy a scenic beachside walk while giving hope to all Queensland women affected by cancer. Held during September in Cairns, Yeppoon, Bargara, Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast, in support of Cancer Council Queensland, the fundraising walk also provides an opportunity for families to get…

Breast cancer survival disparities consistent across Australia

Queensland researchers in collaboration with Cancer Australia have undertaken the nation’s first systematic review examining published evidence showing how breast cancer outcomes across the continuum of care varied for Australian women depending on where they lived. The Cancer Council Queensland study, published in BMJ Open, found that regional women across Australia consistently faced lower survival…

Cervical Screening Program: your questions answered

By Cancer Council Queensland CEO Chris McMillan If you have a cervix – this is for you! At the end of last year, the two-yearly pap test was replaced with a new cer vical screening program. The new program will screen women aged 25-74 every five years, with evidence showing the renewed program is far…

Women living in north and west Queensland face increasing chance of breast cancer

Breast cancer incidence rates are increasing faster in north and west Queensland than in the rest of the state, a new Cancer Council Queensland study has found[1]. Researchers from Cancer Council Queensland examined incidence and survival patterns for the five most common cancers in 516 areas across the state, diagnosed between 1997-2004 and 2005-2012. For…

Cancer screening a priority for International Women’s Day

Ahead of International Women’s Day (March 8), Cancer Council Queensland is urging women to put their health and wellbeing first and get screened to save lives. In Queensland, only 56 per cent of all eligible women aged 50-74 participate in recommended breast screening through BreastScreen Queensland – leaving around 44 per cent of women unscreened,…